In May 2015 I raised my disappointment with the speed limit having been lowered between Yea and Molesworth.

After contacting Murindindi Shire and the Vic Roads, I was assured that the reduced speed limit was only a temporary measure and the speed limit would be increased again once new safety measures (wire barriers) were in place.

I am very disappointed with the lie or change in decision regarding the return of the speed limit to 100 km/h.

When I initially heard rumours of the speed limit between Yea and Molesworth being dropped to 80k I assumed it was an April fools hoax. Imagine my surprise/disappointment when I found the hoax to be true.

I have travelled this section of road over the past 30 years at least 30 times per year and at times twice a week.

I have never witnessed an accident in this section and most of the near misses I have witnessed were caused by slow drivers. Yes, the slow drivers (frequently speeding up in sections where overtaking is possible) cause such a degree of frustration that other drivers eventually take risks in corners and otherwise not recommended sections of the road.

I feel that reducing yet another section of this trip to a lower speed limit will even further increase total travel times (already increased at Glenburn, Dixons Creek and many other speed reductions over the past decades) which drivers will feel the need to make up for in other sections (to still arrive at the estimated time), hence even further lowering the already limited levels of patience with the frustratingly slow and variable speed drivers.

I could see other measures having benefits to road safety other than the kneejerk reaction taken.
e.g.
1. Enforce a minimum speed limit with a limit to number of cars held up (similar to trialled many years ago during a Easter break)

2. Enforce lights on in day (and night) time driving (as often oncoming traffic can’t be seen)

3. Fine drivers increasing their speed in overtaking opportunities

I have seen people taking unnecessary overtaking risks on numerous occasions due to frustrations with the lack of progress with their journey. This is only exacerbated during the ski season.

Drivers are now even less tolerant of people traveling below the speed limit as they feel the need to make up for time they have lost in the low speed sections.

Not only is the decision not to return the speed limit to its former state annoying many drivers that regularly use the road and have to spend more travel time each year. It is also making the road a more dangerous place due to the above mentioned additional frustrations.

Regards
Henk Vegter

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